4 Myths About Mobility in the Workplace

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The use of mobile devices for business can no longer be ignored. It’s changing the way business is done and that’s proving to be a positive thing. While many organizations have taken this development in stride, others are turning a blind eye to the inevitability of business mobility. Research and statistics show that technology brings many advantages to the table, and70% of professionals will work via smart, mobile devices by 2018. Why leave your professionals in the dust? Let’s debunk some of the major myths regarding mobility in the workplace.

Myth #1: Your employees will be less productive.

Today, your employees will actually be less productive if they’re chained to one location, without the option for mobility. The fact of the matter is that work productivity is a management problem, not a technology problem. 90% of business communications stretch far beyond the local workplace – so why limit employees to that local workplace? Imagine that an employee has to leave the office for a meeting or to make a sale. It’s counterproductive for that employee to head back to the office to complete and submit a form, and it’s not good for your customer service if employees in the field can’t access necessary data or complete deals on the spot. Business mobility strategies actually save time and can ultimately increase sales by giving employees the tools they need to make quick decisions. These capabilities also improve a business’ reputation.

64% of employees conduct some sort of business after hours at home. The magic of cloud computing and mobile devices is that they allow people to complete business tasks from any location, at any time. This actually increases productivity, allowing your employees to produce the same quality of work while away on a business trip or otherwise working remotely.

Myth #2: Mobility will make your business less secure.

Of course, as with most technology, there is risk associated with business mobility. But, as with most technology, risk can be addressed.

As you implement mobility into your business, you simply need to focus on risk management and security. By paying attention to Mobile Device Management, analytics, encryption, authentication and strict policies, you can implement a mobile strategy in a risk-free way.

Many studies show that employees are already using smart devices for work, with or without company approval. Rather than ignoring this fact or expecting to put a stop to this trend, address it by creating a company-wide policy. This should include the acceptable use of devices, security measures, technical standards, etc. Check out this article for guidelines on how to do BYOD the right way. This can (and probably should) be something that employees are required to sign off on. It should also be accessible to employees at all times.

Though employee policies tend to fall to the Human Resources department, this is a process that should include the IT team and others with a knowledge of technology and mobility. By combining policies with training on the importance of data security and user diligence, the risk of business mobility becomes no greater than that of other business initiatives.

Myth #3: All mobile devices are the same.

You may be thinking, “Well of course they’re not all the same,” but too many businesses today are treating all devices equally. People use different devices for different reasons. Compare the typical use of a laptop vs. smartphone vs. tablet. Of course there is overlap, but one policy won’t necessarily cover the essentials for all of these devices. They might each require unique management strategies, so a business should address that when moving forward with a mobility strategy.

Myth #4: Business mobility is optional.

The fact is that mobility is a huge part of the business world already. Almost 1/3 of enterprise data is accessed through mobile devices today. Organizations ignoring this fact might find themselves falling behind. Today, a great business strategy practically requires a mobility strategy, as it factors into employee productivity, company collaboration, business profits, customer service, marketing and much more. And any business expecting to grow will need to give employees the ability to access business data on the go. The trend towards mobility is driven by a desire for greater productivity and flexibility. To ignore it would be counterproductive for a business.

Don’t let your business down. Mobility in the workplace is important. By debunking these popular myths, we hope to help businesses adopt a mobility strategy that is both effective and safe.

In Cloud We Trust – Cloud Security

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We’ve all heard it before: “If you move to the cloud, all of your data will be at risk!”

Countless studies have shown that cloud security is the major factor standing in the way of cloud adoption. While in some cases companies are right to be wary, like most things, not all cloud providers are created equal. In fact, the security a company experiences with the cloud solely depends on the provider chosen. It’s wrong to lump all cloud providers together and assume a general opinion on cloud security, whether that opinion is good or bad. Just as some companies currently have better in-house security than others, some cloud providers view security as a larger priority than others. And the word security is all-encompassing, referring to physical and network security, as well as compliance.

Physical Security

A great cloud provider will have multiple physical security measures in place. Look for providers that can offer the following: full credential-limited access to data centers, key card protocols, biometric scanning systems, exterior security systems, on-premises security guards, digital surveillance and recording, secured cages, around-the-clock interior and exterior surveillance monitor access, and employees that have undergone multiple, thorough background security checks. This isn’t asking too much. These are the things that will protect your information. The best facilities will also include environmental controls such as redundant HVAC systems, circulated and filtered air, and fire suppression systems.

Network Security

A reliable cloud provider should be able to guarantee geographical diversity of data center locations as well as full redundancy. With these steps in place, companies can ensure that in the event of a disaster, their business-critical data and applications will be safe and accessible, even if one of the data centers is affected. Look for in-flight and at-rest encryption, strong firewalls, password protection and around-the-clock monitoring. Make your provider prove itself, and ensure that it can demonstrate strict and accurate Service Level Agreements.

Compliance

Today, more and more industries have regulations and standards to meet. “Compliance” is an extremely important word for businesses in all industries, as it refers to the laws that are in place for security and privacy purposes. Your cloud provider should meet, if not exceed, large compliance laws such as HIPAA, PCI DSS, and Sarbanes-Oxley. Whether or not your company needs to meet these regulations, you want a cloud provider that understands and follows the top compliance laws because this demonstrates that they are knowledgeable and trustworthy.

The reality of today is this: cloud computing is a growing, important technology that is being adopted by the majority of businesses. In order to remain relevant and modern, cloud is the way to go. By no means should you risk your company’s security to do so, but you should work to find a provider that is trustworthy and can offer excellent physical and network security for your data. You have to remember that cloud providers are businesses too – they put loads of money into ensuring that their customers information is secure. For the most part, they aren’t willing to risk their reputation and customers for lesser security. As long as you take the appropriate steps to ensure you’re working with a legitimate, secure provider, the cloud is ‘absolutely a viable and intelligent option for your organization. And when you make the move, you’ll experience better security than you ever had in-house.

IoT and the Impact of “Smart” Technology

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The Internet of Things (IoT) isn’t exactly new – according to The Guardian, the first Internet-connected toaster was unveiled at a conference in 1989, and does anyone remember the movie “Smart House”? People have been intrigued by the idea of connecting, well, anything and everything for years and years now! Today, however, we finally have the technology in place to do so, and the Internet of Things is really taking off.

IoT Defined

The Internet of Things revolves around increased machine-to-machine communication, and it’s said that this technology will make everything from streetlights to seaports “smart.” Its true value lies in the intersection of gathering data and analyzing it. Today, there’s a huge network of physical objects that are embedded with electronics, software, sensors and connectivity. These objects, or “things”, are able to both collect and exchange data, and the network will only continue to grow in coming years.

In really simple terms, the Internet of Things is all about connecting devices and objects over the Internet. They are able to talk to each other and to us. There are plenty of examples already: smart technology in automobiles, the smart fridge, mobile devices, wearable technology, and so much more. And IoT isn’t even limited to singular devices. Imagine a true smart home, or an entire smart city!

The Challenges

Security is always a top concern when new technology is introduced. It’s extremely valid, as devices within the IoT will certainly be gathering a lot of data about people. This is a challenge that experts in the Internet of Things are already working to overcome, and it’s still in the early stages. There have not yet been excessive hackings, but as IoT develops, it will be more attractive to hackers – this means more emphasis should be put on security in these early stages to avoid problems later. However, it’s important to keep in mind that these devices are just as susceptible as a home PC or smartphone – it’s all on an even playing field. And as the Internet of Things grows, so will security technology.

Another concern is how the Internet of Things will affect business. Some think it will affect productivity levels or lead to an invasion of worker privacy. IoT will almost definitely impact how business is done today, but it can have a really positive impact. Manufacturing already uses the Internet of Things to organize and track machines, while farmers are able to monitor their crops and cattle. As more and more businesses adopt this technology, it can have a significant impact on production and efficiency. And while employees may not like the idea of being tracked throughout the workday, this concern may lead to the implementation of IoT policies to both protect workers and take advantage of the latest technology.

IoT and Cloud Computing

The Internet of Things is built on cloud computing and networks of data-gathering sensors. Cloud-based applications are truly the key to using leveraged data gathered from the IoT. They interpret and transmit the data coming from all these sensors. The cloud provides the infrastructure needed to analyze these huge amounts of data in real time. 55% of IoT developers primarily connect devices through the cloud (Forbes). Cloud computing can also address concerns about security, as cloud security has strengthened significantly in recent years.

With huge levels of data flying around, the cloud is immensely important in the development of the Internet of Things. It has the capability to handle the speed and volume of this data, and ensures that the data remains accessible anywhere, at anytime, using any device. And paired with Big Data, cloud computing also provides valuable insights that businesses can use to customize their offerings.